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The different types of haemorrhoids

There are a number of different types of haemorrhoids / piles. 

The exact nature and type of haemorrhoid / piles that you may be suffering from can only be determined after undergoing a proper examination by a medical professional. Our specialist nurses can help with your diagnosis.

To help you understand a little more about the different types of haemorrhoids and how they may affect your life, we’ve put together a few pages that hopefully shed some light on what to look out for.

Piles can be embarrassing talk about, so the better informed you are, the better able you are to seek help and take steps towards eradicating them.

What are Haemorrhoids?

Haemorrhoids (piles) are enlarged and swollen blood vessels in or around the lower rectum and the anus. It’s very common – about 8 million people in the UK suffer with piles (haemorrhoids).

What Causes haemorrhoids?

The veins around your anus tend to stretch under pressure and may bulge or swell. Haemorrhoids can develop from increased pressure in the lower rectum due to:

  • Straining during bowel movements
  • Sitting for long periods of time on the toilet
  • Having chronic diarrhea or constipation
  • Being obese
  • Being pregnant
  • Having anal intercourse
  • Eating a low-fiber diet
  • Regular heavy lifting

how can i prevent haemorrhoids?

The best way to prevent haemorrhoids is to keep your stools soft, so they pass easily. To prevent haemorrhoids and reduce symptoms of haemorrhoids, follow these tips:

  • Eat more fruits, vegetables and whole grains. Doing so softens the stool and increases its bulk, which will help you avoid the straining that can cause haemorrhoids.
  • Add fibre to your diet slowly to avoid problems with gas.
  • Drink plenty of fluids. Drink six to eight glasses of water and other liquids (not alcohol) each day to help keep stools soft.
  • Fibre supplements. Most people don’t get enough of the recommended amount of fiber — 20 to 30 grams a day — in their diet. Fibre supplements can improve your overall symptoms and bleeding from haemorrhoids. If you use fibre supplements, be sure to drink at least eight glasses of water or other fluids every day. Otherwise, the supplements can cause or worsen constipation.
  • Don’t strain. Straining and holding your breath when trying to pass a stool creates greater pressure in the veins in the lower rectum.
  • Go as soon as you feel the urge. If you wait to pass a bowel movement and the urge goes away, your stool could dry out and be harder to pass.
  • Exercise. Stay active to help prevent constipation and to reduce pressure on veins, which can occur with long periods of standing or sitting. Exercise can also help you lose excess weight that might be contributing to your haemorrhoids.
  • Avoid long periods of sitting. Sitting too long, particularly on the toilet, can increase the pressure on the veins in the anus.
Internal Haemorrhoids

Internal haemorrhoids

Internal haemorrhoids are actually swollen veins and their support tissues, situated in the lower part of your rectum. Sometimes the blood vessels and associated tissues become weak and stretch so thin that they bulge and become irritated

External Haemorrhoids

External haemorrhoids

External haemorrhoids are different from internal haemorrhoids in two important ways: the first and most obvious difference is where they are located – external haemorrhoids, as the name suggests, are on the outside of your anus. Internal haemorrhoids are on the inside.

thrombosed haemorrhoids

Thrombosed haemorrhoids

A thrombosed haemorrhoid, is the medical term for a haemorrhoid that has become swollen due to a small blood clot within the haemorrhoid. The word ‘thrombosis’ means clotting.

Prolapsed Haemorrhoids

Prolapsed haemorrhoids

Internal haemorrhoids can “prolapse.” If they prolapse, they become swollen and protrude outside your rectum. They can be quite uncomfortable when this happens and are more likely to be prone to bleeding.

Cactus3

Sentinel piles

Accurately diagnosing haemorrhoids is difficult, even for medical practitioners. This is especially true of sentinel piles, because they are in fact not haemorrhoids at all. A sentinel pile is also known as a sentinel anal skin tag or rectal skin tag, and, for the more medically minded, may also be called a hypertrophied papilla or fibro-epithelial polyp.

Haemorrhoids

Haemorrhoids stages & grades

If you suffer with haemorrhoids, then understanding how the medical profession grades the different sizes and nature of your piles could be vital in how you approach the treatment of your specific condition.

electrotherapy treatment

Electrotherapy is a non-invasive non-surgical treatment that can be used to treat internal piles and, for most people, enable you to get back to your life on the same day. Please get in touch to discuss your treatment options with a specialist nurse.

No preparation (e.g. no enema)

No anaesthesia

Treatment is carried out in the comfort of your own home

Non-invasive — no cutting or needles

No need to travel to clinic or hospital — our nurses come to you.  

Each treatment takes 10-30 minutes

90% of patients who shared their experience resumed normal activities the same day

Many of our patients are cleared after one treatment. 

Speak with our nursing team...

to discuss your symptoms and treatment options

Our nurses are available Monday-Friday 9am - 5pm

Treatment for Haemorrhoids, Sarah Diamond

lifestyle ADvice

Suffering with haemorrhoids? Need some advice? View our lifestyle booklet for advice on diet, exercise, hydration to help manage your symptoms. 

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